Ever Felt Broken?

Ever have one of those days (or weeks, or months . . . ) those times when it all seems a bit broken beyond repair, or at least breaking up?  I was in full tilt of that feeling, when I walked out our door and found this askew angel, wings broken off, after a mighty wind (we have them a lot around here).  Later, I was reading the insightful blog of Bridget Lyons, an Anusara yoga teacher in Driggs Idaho, who spoke of the Hindu goddess, Akhilandeshwairi.  Her name, translated from the Sanskrit, literally means “the goddess who is never not broken.”  Turns out that she rides around on a crocodile, a creature who kills its prey, not by merely clamping down with its mighty jaw, but by thrashing it around until it becomes dizzy to the point of senselessness (and then pulling into the water to drown).  Apparently, Akhilandeshwairi is a gal who knows how to ride the tides and storms of life.  Her place is one of reminding us that, many times, in some part of our lives or world, that’s the way it is, and the only way through it is . . . well, through it.  As Bridget writes:  “Akhilandeshwari’s reality is one of fragmentation.  She is like a prism, taking in white light and breaking it up into the beautiful color spectrum.  In doing so, she creates more beauty – out of the brokenness.  We are like Akhilandeshwari, and the ways in which we fragment are unique to each one of us.  Our fissures make us who we are.”  Sometimes, we need to look a little deeper, to find the beauty that bursts out of those broken places.

The Ingredients of a Hero . . .

In yoga and Nia, we’ve been focusing on the core — that grounded center of the body, source of our sense of personal power and firey energy — and how that translates into the ways in which we claim and exercise our power in the world.  A hero claims personal power and then uses it with great wisdom and courage.  We (perhaps especially women) sometimes have an uneasy relationship with personal power.  We are quick to give it away, and  uncomfortable claiming it as our own.

Claiming our center, our core, our power, isn’t easy.  I’m reminded of someone who came up to me after class, face glowing, and said “Wow . . . how did you get me to do that?”  I responded by saying “YOU did it . . . all I did was provide the safe container, and the community around you provided the energy that helped give you the courage to go for it!”

On of my yoga teachers, Tiffany Wood, who has been in Moscow at Nourish Yoga teaching this week, spoke last night during class of the “Guru principle.”  My take away from that class is that the guru isn’t a person, but rather that which opens your heart to its full potential.  It is anything that teaches your entire being, even for a moment, how to sing.  The guru connects the heart and the center — the true self and the source of power — and thus mentors the hero.  As Tiffany said, your guru might be a blue yoga block, which when hugged tightly to your body, teaches it to open in a new way.

The guru and the hero are both, ultimately, inside of us, inviting us to know ourselves as we are, nudging us toward who we are becoming.  Thanks to my teachers and to my students for being gurus and heroes this week.

Getting to the core of it . . .

Both  yoga and Nia give us the opportunity to strengthen our core.  Focusing on our core energy brings us right into the grounded, centered part of ourselves.  I like to think it brings us in touch with our authentic, inner hero.  The core brings us to that place of our will, our intent.  To know that we are able to hug into it and expand out of it gives us a quality of confidence and assurance in our practice that can also be a lead for us as we face the challenges of daily life.